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Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Camcorders Discussion

Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Postby Japhet » Fri Sep 15, 2017 6:45 pm

I received a Canon Rebel T4i/650d as a gift and I want to use it mainly for taking video. I want to avoid getting the error "movie recording has stopped automatically" since my friends have encountered it. What SD Card should I buy? What size, how many MBs, what class and does the brand matter? Also could you explain why the error happens? Is it because of the camera's sensor,battery or does it stop recording solely because of the memory card?
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Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Postby Chetwyn » Mon Sep 18, 2017 2:13 pm

SD HC, Class 10, 8gb works very well.
Pick up two or three if you're going to be shooting a lot.

Don't buy a single 32.
If it fails you lose everything.
Better to have backups in your bag than a single card.

I never leave my office without 3 cards per camera in my bag.
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Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Postby Drue » Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:00 pm

I have the T3i and accasionally get the error message.

My camera never gives this message if the card is freshly formatted.

i am using a 16G class 10 card.

Edit I actually have 3 8G cards

This is for the T3i

4G 11 min

8G 22 min

16G 44 min

File size 330mb per min

maximum recording time of one movie clip is 29 min 59 sec It might stop before 29 mins if the internal temp gets hot.
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Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Postby Ahia » Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:05 pm

I agree with Jim A about SDHC Class 10 - preferably with a high write speed like the Sandisk Extreme cards.
I disagree about using multiple cards.
What's the point of splitting your video over 2 smaller cards.
If one card fails you've only got 1/2 a video, which is pretty much useless.
SD cards do fail, so it's good to have a backup, but I've never had one fail on me yet.
If you are that concerned about failure take a hard drive backup device with you.


The difference in cost between 8GB, 16GB and 32GB means I rarely buy less than 16GB these days and usually 32GB.
The combination of raw files and video can fill a 16GB card pretty quickly.

For video I wouldn't use a DSLR anyway.
A proper camcorder would give you proper power-zoom which no DSLR can do.
It would also be less likely to record camera noises such as AF.
The AF on camcorders is usually smoother and faster and doesn't hunt as much.
DSLRs are really not the best tool for shooting video.
Why spend out on a 16 megapixel sensor when 1080p only needs 2MP?

Most DSLRs won't allow you to video for more than 30 minutes without a break whatever card you use.
First of all the file systems on the cards are 32bit, so don't allow more than 4GB in a single file.
Secondly there seems to be a lot of speculation that there are additional EU import duties if the camera can record more than about 30 minutes in a single go because then it is treated as a video camera.
The third thing is keeping a sensor live for that length of time can cause overheat problems.
Most top-end DSLRs can cope with that but cheaper ones may restrict maximum record length even further to ensure it's not a problem.
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Which Memory Card Should I Get For My Dslr When Recording Video?

Postby Waller » Sat Oct 07, 2017 3:49 pm

A Sandisk SDHC or SDXC memory card, choose from 64GB or 128GB
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